Eating Right for Chronic Kidney Disease

You may need to change what you eat to manage your chronic kidney disease (CKD). Work with a registered dietitian to develop a meal plan that includes foods that you enjoy eating while maintaining your kidney health.

The steps below will help you eat right as you manage your kidney disease. The first three steps (1-3) are important for all people with kidney disease. The last two steps (4-5) may become important as your kidney function goes down

Step 1: Choose and prepare foods with less salt and sodium Why?


To help control your blood pressure. Your diet should contain less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day.

Tips for making healthy food choices


To help control your blood pressure. Your diet should contain less than 2,300 milligrams of sodium each day.

Step 2: Eat the right amount and the right types of protein Why?


To help protect your kidneys. When your body uses protein, it produces waste. Your kidneys remove this waste. Eating more protein than you need may make your kidneys work harder.

Tips for making healthy food choices


A cooked portion of chicken, fish, or meat is about 2 to 3 ounces or about the size of a deck of cards. A portion of dairy foods is ½ cup of milk or yogurt, or one slice of cheese

Plant-protein foods:


A portion of cooked beans is about ½ cup, and a portion of nuts is ¼ cup. A portion of bread is a single slice, and a portion of cooked rice or cooked noodles is ½ cup.

Step 3: Choose foods that are healthy for your heart Why?


Heart-healthy foods:


Heart-healthy foods:


Drink alcohol only in moderation: no more than one drink per day if you are a woman, and no more than two if you are a man. Drinking too much alcohol can damage the liver, heart, and brain and cause serious health problems. Ask your health care provider how much alcohol you can drink safely.

Step 4: Choose foods and drinks with less phosphorus Why?


To help protect your bones and blood vessels. When you have CKD, phosphorus can build up in your blood. Too much phosphorus in your blood pulls calcium from your bones, making your bones thin, weak, and more likely to break. High levels of phosphorus in your blood can also cause itchy skin, and bone and joint pain.

Your health care provider may talk to you about taking a phosphate binder with meals to lower the amount of phosphorus in your blood. A phosphate binder is a medicine that acts like a sponge to soak up, or bind, phosphorus while it is in the stomach. Because it is bound, the phosphorus does not get into your blood. Instead, your body removes the phosphorus through your stool.

Logo_white

Dr Ajay Goyal is an expert in the field of Nephrology and Renal Transplant medicine. He is specialist in management of diseases related to kidneys. He has 16 years of Clinical Experience behind him

Address

careforkidney

Kidney Care Centre,

SCO 137, Sector 14,
Panchkula

Copyright 2020 © All rights reserved.